by Christopher Lewis

Currently in Paris, France

I'm not much of a photographer, but I like to play one on Instagram.

stream of consciousness. improvisational comedy. music.

The GPM (genius per minute) in this video is directly proportional to the size of Reggie’s fro.

Google’s New Glasses And The War On Serendipity

via Linda Holmes at NPR:

It is fundamentally opposed to the idea of figuring anything out for yourself. It advances the notion that we are entitled to a noncorporeal, completely nonpersonal presence we talk to like a person (“Where’s the music section?”) so we don’t have to expend the mental energy to suffer the indignity and inconvenience of potentially taking a wrong turn in a bookstore.

read more

It’s inevitable that stuff like this will be on the consumer market one day. We might as well sort out the philosophical implications now before we’re all incapable of even the most basic tasks without the help of technology.

Getting lost in Jonathan Blow’s “The Witness”

[the-witness.net]

by Kyle Orland at Ars Technica:

But Blow says creating a story that was so personal was tougher than he expected, leading to a few initial attempts that “came out kind of patronizing, as you can imagine,” he said. The key to making the writing process work, Blow said, was just opening up in a way that was “very personal and honest and straightforward.” He compared the process to going on a first date, where you can come off as artificial if you try too hard to present what you think your partner wants.

An inside look at a new open world puzzle game from Jonathan Blow, creator of the critically acclaimed sidescroller Braid. I’ve been curious for some time what Blow has been getting up to since Braid, and I’m happy to see that’s it’s both a bit of a departure and an evolution from his previous work.

Where do you draw the line on fair use?

Original photo © Jay Maisel. Low-resolution images used for critical commentary qualifies as fair use.

Andy Baio, one of the founders of Kickstarter and creator of King of Bloop, a chip-tune homage to Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue runs into legal trouble - not about the music, but about the album art:

TL;DR version: Last year, I was threatened with a lawsuit over the pixel art album cover for Kind of Bloop. Despite my firm belief that I was legally in the right, I settled out of court to cut my losses. This ordeal was very nerve-wracking for me and my family, and I’ve had trouble writing about it publicly until now.

It’s a fascinating read. A concise supporting argument by Neven Mrgan (one of the good ones) can be found here.

The Solar Sinter Project

prostheticknowledge:

Solar Sinter Project by Markus Kayser via Creative Applications

I’m truly blown away by this.

A solar-powered 3D printer in an Egyptian desert creates with sand and magnified sunlight to make glass-based objects.

In a world increasingly concerned with questions of energy production and raw material shortages, this project explores the potential of desert manufacturing, where energy and material occur in abundance.
In this experiment sunlight and sand are used as raw energy and material to produce glass objects using a 3D printing process, that combines natural energy and material with high-tech production technology.

Solar-sintering aims to raise questions about the future of manufacturing and trigger dreams of the full utilisation of the production potential of the world’s most efficient energy resource - the sun. Whilst not providing definitive answers this experiment aims to provide a point of departure for fresh thinking.

More at Creative Applications

The new mad scientists rediscover sanity in an insane world.

The Underground Website Where You Can Buy Any Drug Imaginable

via Adrian Chen at Gawker:

Mark, a software developer, had ordered the 100 micrograms of acid through a listing on the online marketplace Silk Road. He found a seller with lots of good feedback who seemed to know what they were talking about, added the acid to his digital shopping cart and hit “check out.” He entered his address and paid the seller 50 Bitcoins—untraceable digital currency—worth around $150. Four days later the drugs, sent from Canada, arrived at his house.

"It kind of felt like I was in the future," Mark said.

Between this, the actions of Lulzsec, and the antics of Anonymous, I’m sensing a growing underworld far beyond the reach and control of our existing state-run policing agencies. I wonder what William Gibson’s perspective is on all this, he basically predicted all this would happen.

I doubt Silk Road will last for much longer now that the secret is out, but I’m sure there are a number of other sites just like it that we simply don’t know about. The use of Bitcoin here requires an entire analysis all its own; we’ve simply never had such an untraceable currency before. I’m hoping this doesn’t completely destroy its reputation though, I’m genuinely excited to see it take off.

Read more here.

Radiohead - Paranoid Android: YouTube Artists Mix by OHADI22

YouTube user OHADI22 does some incredible digital alchemy, splicing together over 30 other videos, all a cover for Radiohead’s iconic Paranoid Android. The result is incredible.

Skills For Life PPP

By Nick Gentry

via tumblr user findesaison

There is a wonderful and disjointed texture at work here. Gentry has a number of other works in a similar style, all of which can be found here.
Skills For Life PPP

By Nick Gentry

via tumblr user findesaison

There is a wonderful and disjointed texture at work here. Gentry has a number of other works in a similar style, all of which can be found here.

Skills For Life PPP

By Nick Gentry

via tumblr user findesaison

There is a wonderful and disjointed texture at work here. Gentry has a number of other works in a similar style, all of which can be found here.

Stuxnet: Anatomy of a Computer Virus

Credit to Patrick Clair and Scott Mitchell. Produced by Zapruder’s Other Films.

A short but gorgeously executed infographic about the Stuxnet virus, one of the first heads in the new dynasty of open-source cyber weapons.

William Gibson’s vision of the future from the 80s are not far off the mark.

via Rob Beschizza at BoingBoing:


Amazing favicon hacks such as Matheiu Henri’s Defender of the Favicon made me wonder: just how small could a game go? I’m not much of a coder, but over the weekend I had a go at making an adventure game only 8x8 pixels in size. 
It’s barely-playable and has all the charm of a malicious lite-brite. But once you’ve found the sword, shield and the all-important, all-healing pub, you can dash through it in a few minutes. I bet a really great programmer could fit a proper roguelike into the same space!


This goes beyond proof-of-concept; it’s a fully playable adventure game that fits inside 64 pixels and manages to still be fun. The randomized scenario flavors are also a nice touch. My one gripe is that it’s flash based, but there’s nothing about it that requires it. A future JS/CSS/HTML version would be nice.
via Rob Beschizza at BoingBoing:


Amazing favicon hacks such as Matheiu Henri’s Defender of the Favicon made me wonder: just how small could a game go? I’m not much of a coder, but over the weekend I had a go at making an adventure game only 8x8 pixels in size. 
It’s barely-playable and has all the charm of a malicious lite-brite. But once you’ve found the sword, shield and the all-important, all-healing pub, you can dash through it in a few minutes. I bet a really great programmer could fit a proper roguelike into the same space!


This goes beyond proof-of-concept; it’s a fully playable adventure game that fits inside 64 pixels and manages to still be fun. The randomized scenario flavors are also a nice touch. My one gripe is that it’s flash based, but there’s nothing about it that requires it. A future JS/CSS/HTML version would be nice.

via Rob Beschizza at BoingBoing:

Amazing favicon hacks such as Matheiu Henri’s Defender of the Favicon made me wonder: just how small could a game go? I’m not much of a coder, but over the weekend I had a go at making an adventure game only 8x8 pixels in size.

It’s barely-playable and has all the charm of a malicious lite-brite. But once you’ve found the sword, shield and the all-important, all-healing pub, you can dash through it in a few minutes. I bet a really great programmer could fit a proper roguelike into the same space!

This goes beyond proof-of-concept; it’s a fully playable adventure game that fits inside 64 pixels and manages to still be fun. The randomized scenario flavors are also a nice touch. My one gripe is that it’s flash based, but there’s nothing about it that requires it. A future JS/CSS/HTML version would be nice.

thenextweb:

(via The world’s first location aware musical album app drops today - Apps)

This App/Album (Applum…?) currently only works at DC’s National Mall, but the idea is creative. As the listener of the album moves around, the music changes, music that is intentionally crafted to sound a certain way for a given location.

An idea occurs to me: an audio scavenger hunt based on the same mechanic. As you approach certain areas of interest, audio clues are triggered to lure you on. Or perhaps I’ve just described what this already is; sadly, I don’t live anywhere near DC.